NBC

There’s No Song Like “Home”

The other night, we watched “A Home For the Holidays” on CBS, which is a lovely Christmas special focusing on families who have been blessed by adoption.  They show little vignettes of families sharing their adoption stories and have different musical performances for a studio audience of adopted kids and their families.

One of the musical performances was American Idol winner Phillip Phillips performing his hit song “Home”, a beautiful song that was very appropriate for a show about adoption.  If you are one of the six people in the world not familiar with the song (or if you, like me, like to listen to it) you can play it here:

But that was not the only thing to stick out to me – it is (at least) the fourth different television network to use that song.  The unofficial list:

  • FOX:  Where it all started:  American Idol
  • NBC:  “Home” was played during the Summer Olympics whenever they were getting ready to show a women’s gymnastics segment.
  • ABC:  Used it in promos for Extreme Makeover – Home Edition
  • CBS:  A Home For the Holidays, live performance

While I’m sure I’m missing some other examples, I find it fascinating* that all four of the broadcast networks have used the same song fairly prominently in their programming.

*Even though I am a big dork for obscure observances like this, I’m using “fascinating” very loosely.

In this day and age, playing songs during TV shows is very common.  Grey’s Anatomy helped The Fray sell millions of albums.  And I’d be willing to wager that ESPN plays more music than MTV does.  But for the most part, these songs tend to be pretty exclusive to a network – or at least a corporate structure.  Off the top of my head, I can’t think of another song that has been used this prominently on multiple networks – let alone the big four broadcast networks (but if you can, drop it in the comments).

Sandy’s Audience

Yesterday, with the mega-Franken-hurri-storm-of-the-Century-cane attacking the east coast, a number of TV shows taped in New York City were cancelled.  Two notable exceptions – The Late Show with David Letterman, and Late Night with Jimmy Fallon – kept their shows going, but did so without studio audiences.

The results were fascinating.

This piece from Slate has some video clips of what viewers saw – an odd attempt to hold a normal show under very unique circumstances.  Obviously, the most noticeable difference was the lack of a studio audience.  You could tell both Letterman and Fallon missed the laughter, applause, and other feedback they get from their audience.  Fallon especially – he performs his monologue like normal, but you can see how the lack of laughter really throws off his timing and makes him uncomfortably nervous – which in turn makes for interesting TV.

As for Letterman, apparently the guy who does the graphics for the Top Ten list couldn’t make it in to work, so they went decidedly low-tech:  the opening title and each of the Top 10 Rejected Names for the Storm were written in marker on poster board.  Letterman’s interview with Denzel Washington (a pretty big name for such an odd show) was even more casual than the typical talk show interview.

The whole experience was unique, memorable, and slightly surreal.  Watching The Roots laugh heartily at Fallon’s awkward monologue and seeing a very relaxed Denzel slouching on Dave’s couch transformed the shows from two popular late night shows to their elemental state:  a random cable-access talk show with good guests and house band.  In other words, it was like Wayne’s World filmed in the Ed Sullivan Theater.

Thought of the Day – 7/28/2012

Today’s thought:

Surely, I am not the only one who is seeing listing for the Olympics in the channel guide and thinking “Triple X?  I’m surprised they can show that on NBC.”

Olympics After Dark?

Of course, in the span about 30 seconds during last night’s opening ceremonies, Bob Costas referenced “women’s wrestling” and a “champion breast stroker”.

Just sayin’…

 

%d bloggers like this: